Brazos County Historic Markers

Use the page numbers at the bottom of the page to navigate the historical markers listed below. Click on the thumbnail images to see a larger size image, and click the title of each historic marker to see more information about it. Also available online is an interactive Google map of historic markers in Brazos County.

List of historical markers

Date Added:
2016
Historic Marker Info:

First Christian Church of Bryan/College Station

Bryan was first platted as a town in 1860 and was formally incorporated as the City of Bryan in 1871. The First Christian Church was organized in Bryan in 1866 and early meetings were held in local businesses and private homes. Colonel J.S. Proctor and Judge Spencer Ford were prominent in the organization of the First Christian Church and in the civic life of Bryan during this time. The first sanctuary was built in 1868 on the corner of 27th and Dallas Streets, now Texas Avenue. The building was constructed with red brick and featured a steeple and bell but was torn down and replaced with a new building in 1907. However, in December 1925, the church and all records were destroyed by a fire. The congregation held services in the Masonic Lodge building until the new church was completed in 1928.

In the aftermath of the attack on Pearl Harbor in December 1941, Bryan and College Station saw a rise in military personnel. With the end of WWII, the area continued to grow and congregants soon realized the need for expansion. The church began acquiring land on Ennis Street, with just over two acres of land by 1962. The new structure on Ennis Street was dedicated in March 1961 with expansions made in 1974 and 2009. Around this time, the church formally changed its name from First Christian Church of Bryan to First Christian Church of Bryan/College Station. Over the years, the church has been involved with many public and church projects and programs, including youth and community outreach, disaster relief, hospice, mission work and more. As one of the first religious organizations in the town of Bryan, the First Christian Church’s heritage of service continues into the 21st century.

Special Directions/Instructions:
Date Added:
2015
Historic Marker Info:

In the late 1890s, Sam Luther donated the land at this site for a school. At the time, most residents of the Leonard Community were Polish, German and Czech immigrants who were drawn to the area by the Brazos River’s rich soil. The Leonard School went through the eighth grade and emphasized vocational agricultural training. Students at the Leonard School got out from April to October to help their parents harvest cotton. The school’s two classrooms were separated by a divider that could be moved to convert the building into a public meeting place. After the students went home, the Leonard School hosted dances, weddings, pageants, Sunday schools and local elections. African American students went to a separate school on Silver Hill Road, two miles away.

Over time Leonard’s small rural community began to change. The school did not have running water or electricity until the Rural Electrification Administration reached the area in the 1930s. Starting in 1932, Brazos County Superintendent Mrs. W.E. Neeley ran a “Bookwagon” that delivered books to Leonard School students during the summer months. In the 1940s, buses began taking graduates of the Leonard School to high school in Bryan. The age of small rural schools was ending as the county decided it was more cost effective to bus all of its students to school in Bryan or College Station. In 1978, the Office of County Superintendent was abolished. The humble two-room Leonard schoolhouse, which had served its students and its community for fifty years, was closed in 1946 and the building was moved.

Narrative/Supportive Research:
Special Directions/Instructions:
Date Added:
1996
Historic Marker Info:

Formal education for African Americans in Brazos County began as a result of the Public School Act of 1871. Classes were held in many small community and church-related schools, and by 1923 there were 127 African American students in the A&M Consolidated School District. Buildings accommodated only elementary school students until an agreement was reached to bus pupils to the Kemp High School in Bryan. The A&M School District paid the expenses. In the 1930s the number of African American students grew steadily. Rising costs of tuition and transportation prompted the A&M District to approve and build a high school in College Station. The A&M Consolidated Negro School opened in 1941. An athletic field was added in 1946 and the name of the school changed to Lincoln School. The building was expanded in 1948. A fire in 1966 destroyed one of three classroom buildings displacing 100 students. The burned facilities were not rebuilt. The City of College Station leased the land and the remaining five buildings in the late 1960s, and restored the site in 1972. The city bought the land in 1978 and dedicated the Lincoln Center in 1980. The former school is now the home of many community activities in College Station. (1996)

Special Directions/Instructions:

1000 Eleanor St., College Station.

Date Added:
1974
Historic Marker Info:

There was a schoolhouse near this site in 1854 when, according to tradition, the first interment was made here. That early grave, for a child by the name of Whitley, had no marker and has been lost. This land was part of a one-league headright grant made on Oct. 15, 1832, by Mexico to George W. Singleton, who had come to Texas with the "Old 300" settlers of Stephen F. Austin. Two of Singleton's heirs, living in Washington County, on Oct. 2, 1856, deeded ten acres from the grant for the use and benefit of the Methodist Episcopal Church South. The Alexander Church building was then erected near the school, and burials were continued in the area. The earliest identifiable grave is that of one of the original trustees of the property, James Walker (1817-74). William Lawrence, another of the first trustees, was also buried here, in 1879. The Alexander Cemetery Association was formed in 1941, with A.J. McCallum as President and L.T. Wilson, Secretary-Treasurer. Joe B. Walker, Wilson's successor, has served the association for 27 years. The association installed the chain link fence and water supply system. There are about 300 marked graves, and the cemetery is still open to burials.

Special Directions/Instructions:

From the intersection of SH 6 and FM 974 (North Bryan) take FM 974 north approximately 5.3 miles to Alexander Rd.; then NW on Alexander Rd. approximately .9 mile to Alexander Cemetery Rd., then on Cemetery Road approximately .1 mile to cemetery.

Date Added:
1968
Historic Marker Info:

Organized in 1854 by Robert Alexander, Circuit Rider. First church built of hand-hewn logs in 1856 by early settlers, George Fullerton, Hugh Henry, Jim Walker, John Walker, E.W. Thompson and others. Ten acres of church land donated by Eliz Boatwright and John Singleton was deeded to the following trustees: James Walker, William Lawrence, John B. Wallace, William Glass and Harvey Mitchell. Second church was built in 1908 - W.D. Gardner, Pastor. Third church was built in 1939 - Willard Smith, Pastor.

Narrative/Supportive Research:
Special Directions/Instructions:

From the intersection of SH 6 and FM 974 (North Bryan) take FM 974 north approximately 5.3 miles to Alexander Rd., then NW on Alexander Rd. approximately .9 mile to Alexander Cemetery Rd., then on cemetery road approximately .1 mile.