Brazos County Historic Markers

Use the page numbers at the bottom of the page to navigate the historical markers listed below. Click on the thumbnail images to see a larger size image, and click the title of each historic marker to see more information about it.

Also available online is an interactive Google map of historic markers in Brazos County.

Date Added:
1963

Millican was Texas' northernmost railroad terminus when the war between the states began in 1861. It became a vital Confederate shipping point for the area extending to the Red River on the north and to be frontier settlements in the west. The products of that region moved over the rails of the Houston and Texas Central Railroads from Millican to Houston, Beaumont, Galveston and Alleyton.

Confederate troops came by rail to nearby Camp Speight, a training and rendezvous point. Many marched overland from here for duty in Arkansas and Louisiana. Other entrained here for Houston and Beaumont where they boarded ships for Neblett's Landing on the Sabine and other debarkation points.

During the war cotton from North Texas and the Brazos Valley went to market through Millican to Alleyton, the state's southernmost railroad terminus, where it was transported over the cotton road by wagons and carts to Brownsville and Matamoros, Mexico. Returning wagons and carts brought military supplies and merchandise which eventually reached Millican by rail for wide distribution.

Millican, which had been born with the coming of the railroad in 1859, flourished with the railroad, and declined with the northward extension of the railroad that began in 1866.

Narrative/Supportive Research:
Special Directions/Instructions:
From College Station take FM 2154 SE approx. 14 miles to the intersection of FM 2154 and FM 159. This marker was erected by the State as a part of its Civil War Centennial observation.
Date Added:
2002

Old Three Hundred Colonist William T. Millican was born in South Carolina about 1780 and came to Texas with his parents and siblings in 1821. They joined Stephen F. Austin's first colony and were granted land in this area on which to make their home. The community that grew up around their land became known as Millican. W. T. Millican's property was granted in 1824, and in the 1826 census he was listed as a farmer and stock raiser. Just prior to the outbreak of the Texas Revolution, he served as a delegate to the consultation at San Felipe in 1835, which endorsed the establishment of a provisional government for the colonists. The Millican family fled their home in 1836 as part of the Runaway Scrape, as news spread of Sam Houston's retreat eastward from Mexican general Santa Anna. Millican's father, Robert Hemphill Millican, died during the flight. By the time the rest of the family reached Liberty, victory had been won at San Jacinto and they returned to their home. From April until July 1836, W. T. Millican served in the Republic Of Texas army to guard the frontier and posthumously was awarded land at this site from Sam Houston for his service. During the years of the Republic, Millican served as a public official in several capacities, including Justice of the Peace and a member of the committee appointed to select a county seat for Brazos County (first called Navasota County) upon its establishment in 1841. He died two years later and was buried in the Weaver Cemetery in Millican. (2002)

Special Directions/Instructions:
3 mi. NW of Millican on FM 2154, then 1 mi. W on High Prairie Rd.
Date Added:
1965

Came to Texas from Tennessee in 1839, and joined "minute men" protecting north frontier from Trinity to Brazos River. Moved to Brazos County; served 1842-1853 in County offices: Deputy Clerk, County Clerk, Surveyor, Chief Justice. Taught school, had a store, farmed. Led in building churches; also Brazos County courthouses of 1846, 1853, 1878. During Civil War, was assessor of Confederate state taxes. As a member of a local committee, his determination and tact secured the location of the A. & M. College of Texas for his county. He rightly deserves title, "Father of Brazos County".

Narrative/Supportive Research:
Special Directions/Instructions:
Brazos Courthouse main entrance, 300 East 26th St., Bryan.
Date Added:
1986

Land for this cemetery was sold in 1889 by Josef Stasta (1833-1894) to Joseph Mekeska, president of Moravian Brothers Burial Ground. The deed specified the land would be used exclusively for a Moravian cemetery. The cemetery contains eleven grave markers. All but one of the stones are inscribed in Czech. The one English-language stone marks four graves.

Land for this cemetery was sold in 1889 by Josef Stasta (1833-1894) to Joseph Mekeska, president of Moravian Brothers Burial Ground. The deed specified the land would be used exclusively for a Moravian cemetery. The cemetery contains eleven grave markers. All but one of the stones are inscribed in Czech. The one English-language stone marks four graves. The earliest known burial is that of Marie Siptak (Jan. 19-Feb. 16, 1885). The last interment took place in 1906. Though only fifteen graves are marked, the cemetery may contain as many as forty-one burials.

Special Directions/Instructions:
5911 Knightsbridge St., (Copperfield Subdivision), Bryan.
Date Added:
1975

Situated where the Old San Antonio Road crossed the Brazos River, this public ferry was begun by Michael Boren (1806-75) about 1846. The ferry and a settlement nearby were named for Daniel Moseley (1787-1856), who took over the service in 1849 and whose family ran it until 1868. Other ferrymen continued to transport travelers, livestock, and freight across the river until 1912, when The Houston & Texas Central (now the Southern Pacific) constructed a railroad bridge at this location. Today a highway bridge spans the Brazos where Moseley's ferry once operated.

Narrative/Supportive Research:
Special Directions/Instructions:
Although the marker is located in Burleson County, it is included because of its proximity to Brazos County.
Date Added:
2004

Bryan's St. Joseph Roman Catholic Church began in 1873 with a congregation that drew from the city as well as rural communities in the area. For the next 25 years, the church used existing cemeteries for the burials of parishioners. These included Bryan City Cemetery, Moravian (Smetana) Cemetery and Kurten Cemetery. The Rev. Joseph Pelnar began his tenure at St. Joseph's in July 1890, and he directed early efforts to establish a cemetery for the congregation. In 1896, the Bryan city council declared that only residents of the city proper could be buried in the city cemetery. This excluded a number of church members, and in December of the following year Rev. Pelnar bought a ten-acre tract of land at this site. In March 1898, he blessed all but one acre of what was initially named Calvary Cemetery. The remaining acre was reserved for those who were ineligible by Catholic canon law for a sanctioned burial. That acre has since been incorporated into the rest of the cemetery. Today, the burial ground is a tie to the history of the Bryan area's Catholic residents. Historic Texas Cemetery - 2004

Special Directions/Instructions:
2811 Old Kurten Rd, between SH 6 Business and SH 6, Bryan.
Date Added:
1972

Founded 1870 by Odd Fellows Lodge. Housed in a 2-story frame building. Taught drawing, English, French, German, Greek, Latin, music, philosophy, geometry, trigonometry, science, surveying, penmanship. Had primary to young adult students, attracted here from an 80-mile area. Records do not show planned orphanage ever operated. Funds came chiefly from tuition fees. During 5-year career, school taught future Texas leaders. The building was sold (1875) to W.W. and B.L. James and Mrs. V.D. Eaton, for Bryan Academy. It housed St. Joseph's Church 1876 to 1903.

Narrative/Supportive Research:
Special Directions/Instructions:
SE corner of William J. Bryan Pkwy. and Preston Ave., Bryan.
Date Added:
2006

Isom Palmer, whose name has various spellings, was born to Martin and Sarah (Hardwick) Parmer. In 1825, the Palmer (Parmer) family moved to Texas, settling near Nacogdoches the next year, and participated in the 1826 Fredonian Rebellion. Palmer fought under Capt. John M. Bradley during the Siege of Bexar in late 1835. He then served as sergeant-at-arms at the signing of the Texas Declaration of Independence at Washington-on-the-Brazos. He later wed Laura E. Dougherty and moved to Brazos County in the early 1870s.

Narrative/Supportive Research:
Special Directions/Instructions:
Bryan City Cemetery, 1111 North Texas Ave., Bryan, Block 3, Lot 8.

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