Brazos County Historic Markers

Use the page numbers at the bottom of the page to navigate the historical markers listed below. Click on the thumbnail images to see a larger size image, and click the title of each historic marker to see more information about it.

Also available online is an interactive Google map of historic markers in Brazos County.

Date Added:
1965

Native of Missouri. Member of prominent family who were Texas statesmen, planters, developers. Grandson of Moses Austin, who obtained from Mexico charter for American Colony in Texas, but died before making settlement. Nephew of Stephen F. Austin, "Father of Texas", who actually established the colony. Came to Texas with his mother, Emily Austin Bryan Perry, in 1831. During Texas Revolution, fought in Battle of Bexar, 1835. For 71 years was a planter on land near Peach Point, where the bachelor Stephen F. Austin had a room reserved for him in Perry Home. As eldest nephew, inherited family leadership when Stephen F. Austin died in 1836. Backed his brothers' careers, especially in the case of Guy M. Bryan, U.S. Congressman 1858-1860, and for many years a leader in Texas government. During the Civil War, cared for business interests of his 4 sons in the Confederate Army. At his own expense fed Confederate troops stationed near his plantation to defend the Texas coast. Backed construction of Deep Water Harbor at mouth of the Brazos. During building of Houston & Texas Central Railroad, donated site for Bryan, which in 1866 became county seat of Brazos County.

Narrative/Supportive Research:
Special Directions/Instructions:
N side of courthouse square; 300 East 26th St., Bryan.
Date Added:
1969

Center of cultural and civic activities in Bryan since 1903. Established through inspiration of the Mutual Improvement Club (renamed the Woman's Club, 1909) under the leadership of Mmes. Lucy Miley Brandon and Rose Fountain Howell, who with modest means had set the library goal in 1899. An appeal to the industrial magnate and philanthropist Andrew Carnegie secured a grant of $10,000 contingent upon the City's giving a site and pledging maintenance funds. In addition, private persons also gave funds and books.

Auditorium was site of many gatherings, foremost being the 1919 to 1933 reunions of Hood's Texas Brigade Association.

In 1944, the Library Board President, Mrs. Lee J. Rountree, established the Children's Educational Foundation with result that the Rountree Room was opened on converted second floor in 1953.

Special Directions/Instructions:
111 South Main St., Bryan. The text marker at this location is the result of a State-approved local project. The marker was cast locally, which is why it does not resemble the more familiar historical markers. It appears the medallion was obtained at a separate time.
Date Added:
1984

In 1831, Richard Carter (1789-1863), Virginia native and War of 1812 veteran, came from Alabama and received a grant of land within the Stephen F. Austin Colony at the site of what is now the City of College Station. He became one of the area's wealthiest land and slave owners, raising cattle, corn, and cotton during the years before the Civil War. Carter was appointed to the first Board of Commissioners after Brazos County was created in 1841 and helped survey Boonville, its first county seat. Evidence of the Carter home and the family cemetery has been found in this area.

Special Directions/Instructions:
1800 Brazoswood Dr. at the entrance to Richard Carter Park; College Station.
Date Added:
1995

Attorney William R. Cavitt (1849-1924) purchased a city block here in 1875, the year he married Mary Mitchell. Cavitt became Brazos County Attorney in 1878 and about 1880 he and Mary built a brick Italianate residence here. Cavitt later served as a State Legislator and on the Board of Texas A&M University. The Cavitts modified the house in the 1920s to reflect contemporary Colonial Revival influences. The house remained in the Cavitt family until 1978. Recorded Texas Historic Landmark - 1995

Special Directions/Instructions:
713 E. 30th St., Bryan.
Date Added:
1993

In 1871 Texas Governor Edmund Davis appointed three Commissioners to select a site for the newly established Agricultural and Mechanical College of Texas (Texas A&M College). The Commissioners chose this location in large part because of the existence of a Houston and Texas Central (H&TC) Railroad line which began in Southeast Texas and extended through this area to its terminus in Bryan (5 mi. north). Although no railroad depot existed here at the time of Texas A&M's formal opening in 1876, H&TC made regular stops here for incoming and outgoing college students and faculty. H&TC railroad conductor announcements referring to to this stop as College Station gave rise to the name of the surrounding community. H&TC constructed a new depot about 1900. The H&TC depots and another built by the International & Great Northern (IGN) Railroad just east of this site in 1900 were for many students who attended Texas A&M the first remembrance of their collegiate experience. Railroad depots owned by the H&TC (later Southern Pacific) and IGN (later Missouri Pacific) maintained passenger service at this location until 1959. In 1966 the last of the depot structures was razed.

Special Directions/Instructions:
On the Texas A&M campus, on Old Main Drive just E of its intersection with Welborn Rd. (FM 2154), College Station.
Date Added:
2011

The Civil War and its aftermath greatly affected Brazos County. War halted progress of the Houston & Texas Central Railway and made Millican a boomtown. After the war, the railroad created a new town, Bryan City, and brought a need for men and women to build up the new settlement. Bryan City Cemetery is the final resting place of at least 161 Confederate veterans who settled here to help the city develop. Many of their stories intersect in life and in death. Milton Walker Sims, Sr., aide-de-camp on Gen. Paul O. Hebert’s staff, was later given command of his own cavalry regiment. Col. Sims is the highest-ranking Confederate officer in the cemetery. Guy Morrison Bryan, Jr. opened the First National Bank of Bryan (1886) and created the Brazos River Bridge Co. (1896) to erect the first steel bridge over the waterway. Milton Parker, who fought at Shiloh and Vicksburg, was active in commerce, banking and real estate, acquiring vast land holdings in the Brazos River bottoms. William Edward Saunders founded the city’s Commercial Club and was the last Confederate veteran buried here. Briscoe Gerard Baldwin, Jr., Chief of Ordnance for the Army of Northern Virginia, came to Texas to operate a stage line from San Antonio to El Paso, then was superintendent of Brazos County schools. Henry Bates Stoddard was president of Texas Cattle Raisers Association (1887) and, as Brig. Gen. in the Texas Volunteer Guard, presided over ceremonies dedicating the new capitol building in Austin (1888). Many Confederate veterans were early faculty and staff of the Agricultural & Mechanical College of Texas (later Texas A&M), including William Adam Banks, Dr. David P. Smythe, William Bringhurst and Bernard Sbisa. These men with a common bond in war banded together for the common good and progress of their city and state.
175 years of Texas independence * 1836-2011

Special Directions/Instructions:
The marker is located at the grave site of William Edward Saunders, near the front of the cemetery in Block 15 Lot 33. Enter through the old gate on the left as you face the cemetery from North Texas Avenue, take your first right and drive until the road Ts in front of you, then you will see it on the left.
Date Added:
2005

In 1920, David J. Finn and other Texas A&M electrical engineering students attempted to broadcast the football game at Oklahoma A&M via ham radio. When the plan failed they used a telephone backup, relaying game updates to fans gathered in the Texas A&M stock judging pavilion. The following year, students at campus wireless station 5XB planned to transmit live play-by-play accounts of the conference championship against the University of Texas. William A. Tolson and other students overcame technical difficulties to make the broadcast possible. They ran lines from the Kyle Field press box to a transmitter at Bolton Hall and borrowed equipment from the Corps of Cadets Signal Corps. They installed three redundant systems: two connected to the power plant and a battery backup. Harry M. Saunders and the coaching staff devised abbreviations to describe the action and improve transmission speed. "TB A 45Y," for example, signified "Texas ball on the Aggie 45 yard line." On game day, November 24, 1921, the broadcast was flawless with Saunders at the telegraph key. At station 5XU in Austin, Franklin K. Matejka relayed messages to Longhorn fans seconds after each play. Amateur radio operators across Texas also followed the action. The game ended in a scoreless tie, but A&M became conference champion. The following year, 5XB became WTAW, and several of the students went on to distinguished careers in engineering, broadcast technology and related fields. By days, the experiment missed being the first such achievement in the U.S., but it is believed to be the first in Texas. Ingenuity and innovation resulted in a pioneering broadcasting accomplishment. (2005)

Special Directions/Instructions:
College Station, West side of Kyle Field, Wellborn Road (FM 2154), on TAMU campus, College Station.
Date Added:
1991

Completed in 1925 for the family of prominent Bryan merchant Eugene Edge (1879-1954) and his wife Cora Zulch (d. 1939), this two-and-one-half story brick house reflects the Georgian Revival style. Defining features include its symmetrical composition, entry portico with Doric columns, stone quoins, gabled dormers, and fanlight transom. After the deaths of Mr. and Mrs. Edge, the house remained in the Edge family until 1978. Recorded Texas Historic Landmark - 1991

Special Directions/Instructions:
609 S. Ennis, Bryan.

Pages