Brazos County Historic Markers

Use the page numbers at the bottom of the page to navigate the historical markers listed below. Click on the thumbnail images to see a larger size image, and click the title of each historic marker to see more information about it.

Also available online is an interactive Google map of historic markers in Brazos County.

Date Added:
1996

Formal education for African Americans in Brazos County began as a result of the Public School Act of 1871. Classes were held in many small community and church-related schools, and by 1923 there were 127 African American students in the A&M Consolidated School District. Buildings accommodated only elementary school students until an agreement was reached to bus pupils to the Kemp High School in Bryan. The A&M School District paid the expenses. In the 1930s the number of African American students grew steadily. Rising costs of tuition and transportation prompted the A&M District to approve and build a high school in College Station. The A&M Consolidated Negro School opened in 1941. An athletic field was added in 1946 and the name of the school changed to Lincoln School. The building was expanded in 1948. A fire in 1966 destroyed one of three classroom buildings displacing 100 students. The burned facilities were not rebuilt. The City of College Station leased the land and the remaining five buildings in the late 1960s, and restored the site in 1972. The city bought the land in 1978 and dedicated the Lincoln Center in 1980. The former school is now the home of many community activities in College Station. (1996)

Special Directions/Instructions:
1000 Eleanor St., College Station.
Date Added:
1974

There was a schoolhouse near this site in 1854 when, according to tradition, the first interment was made here. That early grave, for a child by the name of Whitley, had no marker and has been lost. This land was part of a one-league headright grant made on Oct. 15, 1832, by Mexico to George W. Singleton, who had come to Texas with the "Old 300" settlers of Stephen F. Austin. Two of Singleton's heirs, living in Washington County, on Oct. 2, 1856, deeded ten acres from the grant for the use and benefit of the Methodist Episcopal Church South. The Alexander Church building was then erected near the school, and burials were continued in the area. The earliest identifiable grave is that of one of the original trustees of the property, James Walker (1817-74). William Lawrence, another of the first trustees, was also buried here, in 1879. The Alexander Cemetery Association was formed in 1941, with A.J. McCallum as President and L.T. Wilson, Secretary-Treasurer. Joe B. Walker, Wilson's successor, has served the association for 27 years. The association installed the chain link fence and water supply system. There are about 300 marked graves, and the cemetery is still open to burials.

Special Directions/Instructions:
From the intersection of SH 6 and FM 974 (North Bryan) take FM 974 north approximately 5.3 miles to Alexander Rd.; then NW on Alexander Rd. approximately .9 mile to Alexander Cemetery Rd., then on Cemetery Road approximately .1 mile to cemetery.
Date Added:
1968

Organized in 1854 by Robert Alexander, Circuit Rider. First church built of hand-hewn logs in 1856 by early settlers, George Fullerton, Hugh Henry, Jim Walker, John Walker, E.W. Thompson and others. Ten acres of church land donated by Eliz Boatwright and John Singleton was deeded to the following trustees: James Walker, William Lawrence, John B. Wallace, William Glass and Harvey Mitchell. Second church was built in 1908 - W.D. Gardner, Pastor. Third church was built in 1939 - Willard Smith, Pastor.

Narrative/Supportive Research:
Special Directions/Instructions:
From the intersection of SH 6 and FM 974 (North Bryan) take FM 974 north approximately 5.3 miles to Alexander Rd., then NW on Alexander Rd. approximately .9 mile to Alexander Cemetery Rd., then on cemetery road approximately .1 mile.
Date Added:
1978

This school originated as Madison Academy, founded in 1886 in Madisonville by John Hodges Allen (1854-1920), an educator from Mississippi. When his brother Rivers O. Allen (1865-1925) joined him in 1896, the institution became Allen Academy, a private boarding school for boys. During the summer of 1899, the Allens moved the school to Bryan. In the early years of the 20th Century, enrollment steadily increased. The campus was enlarged and new buildings erected to accommodate the students. During World War I, military training was introduced. In 1925 John Allen's son Nat Burtis Allen (1892-1946) became director of the school. During his tenure, the academy continued to grow and gained national recognition. When he died in 1946, the campus contained over 300 acres, including a farm and dairy. His son Nat Burtis Allen, Jr. (1919-1973) guided the institution until 1973 and led in establishing broader curriculum. Allen Academy is the oldest accredited, non-sectarian preparatory school for boys operating in Texas. Its graduates include leaders in government and business. Today the institution is coeducational and offers a broad range of scholastic programs for boarding and day students.

Special Directions/Instructions:
At the corner of East 22nd St. and Ursuline Ave., Bryan
Date Added:
2012

Methodism among African American Texans predates the Civil War with the first church being established in 1848. The earliest known African American minister in Brazos county was Reverend Emmanuel Hammitt who served under Reverend W.S. South. After emancipation African Americans were free to establish their own churches. Allen chapel African Methodist Episcopal Church (A.M.E.) Is named after Reverend Richard Allen, the founder of the A.M.E. in 1787.
The first meeting of the Allen Chapel congregation was before 1870. Church services were held in brush arbors and Reverend Hammitt became the first minister in 1866. Reverend Charles B. Foster replaced Hammitt as pastor of the Allen Chapel congregation in 1868. The congregation purchased land in July of 1870 to build the first chapel located on North Houston and East 22nd Street. Allen Chapel also served as a school for African American children in 1914 when their school was destroyed by fire. The second church was built in 1920 and the current church in 1961.
The congregation has supported many organizations including the N.A.A.C.P., Bryan Charity Fund, Sickle Cell Anemia Foundation, Bethune Women’s Club and the Gideons. The church continues to fellowship with local churches with proceeds going to those in need. Allen Chapel A.M.E. Church is among the oldest continuing churches in Brazos County. If the formation of a church is measured by the presence of a minister and congregation then Allen Chapel would be one of the earliest organized African Methodist Episcopal congregations in Texas.

Special Directions/Instructions:
Date Added:
1990

The state of Texas granted a charter for an independent school district to encompass the Texas A&M College campus in 1909. Because there was not a sufficient number of students in the district to support a school, A&M president William Bizzell and professor Martin Hayes, head of the department of vocational teaching, persuaded the leaders of three surrounding common school districts to send their students to a new school to be located on the college campus. The new school opened in 1920 with 304 students. It was supported by A&M college with funding for buildings, teacher salaries, furniture, and equipment. It became a model for rural schools in the area, and by 1928 the surrounding school districts officially dissolved and merged with A&M College Consolidated Independent School District. By 1938 the school facilities had become overcrowded. Because the college was not able to increase its contributions to the institution, the school moved off of the A&M campus in 1940. With the move came the genesis of the College Station Independent School District.

Special Directions/Instructions:
2100 block of Welsh Avenue (Welsh Avenue side of football stadium), College Station.
Date Added:
1980

Built for Onah (Ward) Astin (d. 1944), the wife of cotton planter James H. Astin (d. 1897), this house was designed by the Waco firm of Howard Messer and S. Wemyss Smith. Construction began in 1901 and was completed two years later. The exterior of the Classical Revival residence features a two-story gallery with Corinthian columns. Holland Porter, a planter, purchased the home in 1946, and additions were made to the structure during his ownership. Recorded Texas Historic Landmark - 1980

Narrative/Supportive Research:
Special Directions/Instructions:
600 East 29th St., Bryan.
Date Added:
2008

AREA PIONEER, MARY A. WILLIAMS, DONATED LAND FOR THIS BURIAL GROUND TO BETHEL CHURCH IN 1869. IT HAS SERVED RESIDENTS OF THE HARVEY COMMUNITY AND THE SURROUNDING AREA SINCE THAT TIME. THE CEMETERY IS NAMED OLD BETHEL BECAUSE OF ITS CLOSE ASSOCIATION WITH THE CHURCH, WHICH MOVED FROM THIS LOCATION BY THE EARLY 1900s. THE EARLIEST DATED BURIAL, THAT OF ELIZABETH H. HUDSON, DATES TO 1870. OTHERS BURIED HERE INCLUDE EARLY AREA PIONEERS, COMMUNITY LEADERS, AND REPUBLIC OF TEXAS, CONFEDERATE AND U.S.VETERANS. THE CEMETERY FEATURES VERTICAL STONES AND WOODMEN OF THE WORLD MONUMENTS. TODAY, THE OLD BETHEL CEMETERY ASSOCIATION MAINTAINS THE BURIAL GROUND, WHICH CONTINUES TO SERVE THE AREA.

HISTORIC TEXAS CEMETERY-- 2006
MARKER IS PROPERTY OF THE STATE OF TEXAS

Narrative/Supportive Research:
Special Directions/Instructions:
Located in the Harvey Community. From Bryan, go east on William J. Bryan Pkwy (FM 158). (The name of the road changes to Boonville Road on the east side of SH 6.) Go 6 miles to the intersection of FM 158 and Hwy 30 (Harvey Road). Continue east on Hwy 30 for .9 miles to Hardy Weedon Road. Turn left on Hardy Weedon Road and go .6 miles. The cemetery is on the left and enclosed by a chain link fence.

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